Countdown

Schedule

  • Thursday, December 3rd
    Mark Shuttleworth
    10:00 - 10:30
    Bullet-proof and profitable things
    Bullet-proof and profitable things
    Claire Rowland
    10:30 - 10:55
    Coherent UX for Distributed Systems
    Coherent UX for Distributed Systems
    Sam_Winslet_1Sophie_Riches
    10:55 - 11:20
    From 2 to 2 billion: How to design at scale
    How do you design for something when you don't know what it is, or don't know how many things there are going to be? 2 designers from IBM's IoT design team invite you on a journey of an infinite number of unknowns into designing an IoT platform, with the help of the IBM design thinking framework to guide us along the way.
    11:20 - 11:50
    Coffee Break
    kai-moonickl
    11:50 - 12:15
    Hacking NFC with MOO
    Hacking NFC with MOO
    craigc
    12:15 - 12:40
    Things, People and Beer: voice as an alternative user interface for analytics
    demo - using in memory analytics and odata services to explore alternative input methods, namely the Amazon Echo
    Mark Hill
    12:40 - 13:00
    The Things Network London
    The team at OpenTRV will talk about the rollout of The Things Network in London.
    13:00 - 14:00
    Lunch
    davem
    14:00 - 14:25
    IOT and Time Series
    IOT and Time Series
    Yodit Stanton
    14:25 - 14:50
    Secret Life of Buildings
    Secret Life of Buildings
    borisalwayslooksfuckingannoyed
    14:50 - 15:15
    None of your effing business
    Remember Nick O'Leary's "A Conversational Internet of Things" last year? Add my "Ontologies in the IoT" talk, and what you get is an amusing taste of how artificial intelligence needs to get on our nerves before it can become useful in the consumer IoT. Assuming the notorious "50 billion connected devices by 2020", every person from tech sceptic to IoT geek is going to own between none and dozens of them. While in classical M2M applications we know "the sensor", "the actuator" and a business logic, it's going to be completely unclear which combination of things individual consumers are going to have access to and what they want to achieve with them. How can digital "personal assistants" deal with that? Ontologies are great tools for knowledge inference, but they also introduce ambiguity that needs to be resolved by taking context into account. Imagine a thermostat, a smoke detector and an outside thermometer. Conceptually it's easy to understand that -if it shows an unusually high temperature inside, while the smoke detector remains silent and it's cold outside- the thermostat might be broken. Computationally, we're looking an extensive set of scenarios { thermostat broken, outside- thermometer broken, house on fire but smoke alarm broken, etc }, each with a particularly probability. Machine learning algorithms in digital assistants need to be trained to make the right assertion. With endless possible device combinations, this training is likely going to be very user-specific, and given that algorithms are aware that life is full of confounding variables that they need to know about, these interactions are likely going to be rather inquisitive. Thinking about Tom Coates’ now famous blog post on how we are going to interact with a World of Connected Objects, I can just imagine the conversation between James Governor and his digital assistant when it inquires: "James. I believe the thermostat might be broken. Have you. Touched it. AGAIN?”
    15:15 - 15:45
    Coffee Break
    Amanda Brock
    15:45 - 16:10
    The Law and Machine Based Decisions
    juanp
    16:10 - 16:35
    IoT Device Management
    TBC
    Matt Biddulph
    16:35 - 17:00
    Welcome to the Conversation
  • Friday, December 4th
    andy-stanford-clarklaurac
    10:00 - 10:30
    The Ambient Kettle Project
    The Ambient Kettle Project
    Tom Raftery
    10:30 - 10:55
    The Convergence of IoT and Energy
    The Convergence of IoT and Energy
    Jeremiah Stone
    10:55 - 11:20
    Becoming a Digital Industrial - focus challenges and Technologies
    Becoming a Digital Industrial - focus challenges and Technologies
    11:20 - 11:50
    Coffee Break
    James HodgeMatt Davies
    11:50 - 12:15
    Log, I am your father. The role of machine data in the IoT
    In this session we’ll talk about how to make use and find value in the time series, unstructured machine data that characterizes the data from the Internet of Things and plays an important role in Industry 4.0 and the changes in the way we manufacture. From log files to sensors to wire data to SCADA, we’ll explain how to use IoT data for multiple use cases including operations and troubleshooting, security and safety and data analytics. We’ll show how modern data platforms act as a prism to turn the streams of data into the different colours and use cases at scale. We’ll showcase planes, trains and automobiles (and power and buildings) with customers such as Volkswagen who monitor their electric cars, New York Air Brake who have saved their customers a billion dollars from IoT data, Deutsche Bahn who recently conducted an IoT Hackathon and Gatwick Airport who deliver cloud based predictive analytics across the airport. We’ll show how to make the data from IoT available to everyone from developers to operations to analysts and data practitioners. We will end up with a demonstration that shows the art of what’s possible with this time series, IOT generated machine data.
    Keith O'Byrne
    12:15 - 12:40
    We Need to Talk about Telcos
    We Need to Talk about Telcos
    tgrassl
    12:40 - 13:05
    Industrial Scale IoT
    Industrial Scale IoT
    13:00 - 14:00
    Lunch
    kylem
    14:00 - 14:25
    Brought to you by the number 10^n
    Brought to you by the number 10^n
    tamarag
    14:25 - 14:50
    Intelligent Alerts for Pay-as-you-go Offgrid Power
    Intelligent Alerts for Pay-as-you-go Offgrid Power
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    14:50 - 15:15
    BreatheHeathrow. Hack the air.
    As the political debate over Heathrow Airport’s expansion escalates, many people in the local community surrounding the airport are keen to understand the current and potential future impacts of an expanding Heathrow may have upon their lives. Breathe Heathrow is an air monitoring project run by Internet of Things company OpenSensors, designed to help Heathrow residents understand the air quality and noise impacts the airport has on their local areas. Talk will go through the development of the project and analysis of data gained from sensors.
    15:15 - 15:45
    Coffee
    Pat Patterson
    15:45 - 16:10
    From Killer Robot to Killer Product!
    In October 2014, Hexagon Metrology used Python and Beagleboard to build a prototype environmental sensor package for their industrial laser measurement system, and showed it at Salesforce's Dreamforce conference. By June 2015, Hexagon had unveiled their MMS PULSE product, based on this work, and in September they returned to Dreamforce with a full production system. This session details how a quick hack turned into a multi-million dollar product line, offers tips for emulating MMS PULSE, and will inspire you to go start your own IoT project!
    jorex
    16:10 - 16:20
    TBC
    16:20 - 16:35
    Hydrogen Fuel Cells
    Hear Arcola Energy talk about their Hydrogen Fuel Cells, which powered Andy Stanford-Clark's talk last year.
    Sam Phippen
    16:35 - 17:00
    The Most Dangerous Game: Exposing Sixth Formers to Power Tools
    Robots. Teenagers. Power Tools. What could go wrong? This simple formula is what an organisation called Student Robotics has been using for the past several years to bring a whole new generation of engineers and programmers into IOT. Over the course of a full academic year these teenagers learn to build robots, program them in python, and eventually complete. In this talk, we'll look at what it takes to make a successful IOT education competition, and some of the things both organisers and competitors will learn along the way."

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Tickets

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    £175 GBP

    ThingMonk 2015 Regular Attendee

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    £250 GBP

    Grab your tickets for both ThingMonk and MonkiGras, Jan 31st – Feb 1st 2016.

  • Early Bird
    £125 GBP

    ThingMonk Early Bird Ticket